C. Dean Andersson

C. Dean Andersson is an American author of horror and heroic fantasy. His early fiction was published by Avon books under the pen name “Asa Drake” — Crimson Kisses and Lair of Ancient Dreams were collaborations with Nina Romberg. On his own, Andersson adopted the Drake pen name to write a Scandinavian mythos inspired sword and sorcery series known as the Bloodsong saga. The Bloodsong books featured a female S&S protagonist years before Xena graced the airwaves with her sword-slinging talents. The first novels published under Andersson’s own name were released by Warner Books in 1987 and 1988. Torture Tomb and Raw Pain Max were extreme horror novels on the early edge of the Splatterpunk era, although he was never technically considered a Splatterpunk writer. Those novels were part of a loosely connected trilogy of books which ended with Fiend, published by Zebra books in 1994. One of Andersson’s most popular novels was I Am Dracula, part of a short-lived classic monsters-inspired series in the 1990s. His short story “The Death Wagon Rolls On By” was a 2007 Bram Stoker Award nominee.

To browse the list of C. Dean Andersson titles currently available in print and eBook editions, click here.

These cover scans are from the library of author Christopher Fulbright.

Hugh B. Cave

Hugh_B_Cave_1935Hugh B. Cave (July 11, 1910 – June 27, 2004) was a true king of the pulp-fictioneers — one of the most prolific and successful authors of the golden pulp era. Cave sold his first story in 1929 and never looked back; he went on to write over 1000 stories — approximately 800 of those during the 1930s — under so many pseudonyms and appearing in so many magazines that nary a pulp can be named in which Cave did not appear under one name or another. He was a notable contributor to all of the big-name pulps of the time, including Black Mask, Weird Tales, Argosy, all of the weird-menace shudder-pulp titles, and so many more they would be difficult to list. Cave served in the armed forces during World War II as a war correspondant, then spent many years in both Haiti and Jamaica, which provided him foundational knowledge for many of the voodoo-based horror novels he wrote later in life. After World War II, he went on to sell another 350 or so stories to the slicks. In 1977, Karl Edward Wagner’s Carcosa Press released a landmark collection of horror fiction by Cave, Murgunstrumm and Others, which won the 1978 World Fantasy Award. He continued to write and publish novels until his death. Cave is truly one of the most accomplished, and yet largely unsung, pulp-fictioneers. He died in Florida at the age of 93.

To browse the list of Hugh Cave titles currently available in print and eBook editions, click here.

These cover scans are from the library of author Christopher Fulbright.

Gary Brandner

ob-main-brandner2Gary Brandner (May 31, 1930 – September 22, 2013) was best known as the author of The Howling, but met with great success with many of his works throughout the 1970s and 1980s. He sold his first story to Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine while working as a technical writer in 1969.  His success with The Howling in 1977 made him the publishing company Fawcett Crest’s cornerstone in the genre during the horror fiction boom years with novels such as Walkers, Hellborn, Carrion, Quintana Roo, and Cameron’s Closet, which was adapted to film using his screenplay in 1988. He was the author of over 30 novels and more than 100 short stories, mostly horror, but also the Big Brain series and a few non-genre works.  He lived in Nevada, and died of esophageal cancer at the age of 83.

For a list of works by Gary Brandner that are currently available in print and ebook, click here.

The cover scans are from the library of author Christopher Fulbright.

Robert Bloch

Robert Bloch (April 5, 1917 – September 23, 1994) is one of the grandfathers of modern American horror and suspense, with a career spanning over 60 years. A prolific, multiple award-winning writer of more than 30 novels and hundreds of short stories who worked in many genres, Bloch’s straightforward prose, clever twists, and cutting wit were hallmarks of his work. His early stories appeared in Weird Tales in the mid-1930s.  He corresponded with H.P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, and August Derleth during the magazine’s heyday.  He went on to find success in other pulps and genres, working extensively in Hollywood after Hitchcock’s adaptation of his most famous novel, Psycho.  He wrote teleplays for Thriller, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Star Trek, Night Gallery, and Tales from the Darkside, to name just a few.  Bloch died of cancer in 1994, but his work and memory live on.  You can view the featured photo and many others at wisconsinhistory.org.

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These cover scans are from the library of author Christopher Fulbright.

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